Why use a bmp. format

Discussion in 'Hints and Tips' started by dollface, Jun 15, 2008.

  1. dollface

    dollface

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    Can someone explain to me about bmp format and what reason you would use it for.
     
  2. Lamo1graphic

    Lamo1graphic

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    Bitmap graphics are the most common graphic format in use on the web and, indeed, on the computer. With the exception of Flash and the still relatively unsupported .svg (scalable vector graphic) format, every single graphic seen on the web is a Bitmap.

    Bitmap graphics are composed of pixels, each of which contains specific color information. A pixel is minutely small; a single image may be composed of hundreds of thousands of individual pixels. Much like cells revealed from a piece of tissue when seen under a microscope, these pixels are only clearly and individually visible when the image is magnified
    A graphic composed entirely of pixels each with its own color properties is ideal for photographic images where there are thousands, even millions of different colors. Complex fills, shading and gradient effects can easily be rendered. The Bitmap image offers as much freedom as an empty canvas.

    In Bitmap graphics, there is an immutable connection between pixels and the image they compose. When a Bitmap graphic is saved, the computer is really saving an exact visual picture of the image: this pixel goes here and is this color; this pixel goes there and is that color, and so on and so on.

    This connection is responsible for the effects seen when resizing a bitmap graphic. Given three image sizes - an original, one smaller, and one larger - each will naturally contain a different number of pixels. Pixels do not change sizes, but the image has. It takes more pixels to fill the volume of a larger space, fewer to fit into a smaller space.

    Vector graphics consist of points, lines, and curves which, when combined, can form complex objects
    These objects can be filled with solid colors, gradients, and even patterns.
    Vector graphics are mathematical creations. For this reason, the programs that are used to create them save instructions on how the image should be drawn, rather than how it looks. This is the key difference between the two types of graphics. Because the computer has a description of how the image should look, it can be redrawn at any size, in any position, without losing any quality. A vector graphic resized to 5 times its original dimensions is simply reproduced, exactly, at the new size. It can also be freely manipulated without losing coherence, like a rubber band that can be stretched an infinite number of ways.

    The price of this scaling flexibility is that Vector images must remain relatively simple in comparison to Bitmap images. It is impossible to render the nuances of a photographic image in a vector editor; as a result, illustrative vector graphics have a distinct look and feel, even when produced in However, Vector graphics are ideal for producing artwork which frequently needs to be presented in different sizes or colors. Logos especially fall into this category. A logo produced with a vector application can be blown up to fit on a billboard or scaled down to adorn a letterhead with no loss of quality.

    i hope this answers some of your questions:image28:
     
  3. Just Bill

    Just Bill

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    Thanks Lamo

    That is so clearly explained that even I understand.
    I wish that all instructions and explanations were so clear
     
  4. dollface

    dollface

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    Thanks, that was great information
     
  5. Nickydude

    Nickydude MadLad Designs

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    Take a look at Xara Xtreme V4 for photo quality vector art: http://www.xara.com/uk/

    :image28:
     

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