New here and Soooo Lost

Discussion in 'Introduce yourself!' started by RevRho, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. RevRho

    RevRho

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    Hello All,

    I am so lost here. I bought the product to "Save money" on making our own Logo's. I like what I have come up with but can't get the right "size" to upload it beautifuly into Vista print to get our business cards done. I am even interested in getting Banners made but Psh problems there to.

    So are there any "seasoned" "Laughing Birds" that can help?

    I am a Pastor from Fresno.. (Don't hold it against me) With yes, 8 kids! AND I am a woman. Yeh!!!!!! lol I am looking forward to learning as much as I can from you all!

    Thanks in advance! RevRho
     
  2. KD-did

    KD-did

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    Hello RevRho and welcome to the TLC/LBS software forum.
    Hope very shortly you will realize just what a great product you bought. It is extremely versatile and that you are not limited to making just logos and other custom graphics with it. If you have the time you might want to look at some fun things that TLC can be used for.
    http://www.logodesignforum.com/forums/showthread.php?p=57334&highlight=logos+TLC#post57334

    The best thing to do for printing banners and other printing applications is to have your logos converted to eps (vector) file format and the reason being is you will need only one file for all your printing needs, same color same resolution no matter how large or small ( from postage stamp size to the size of a city bus) you need. While TLC doesn't have the capabilities to export as an eps file format surely one of your parishioners has Adobe Photo Shop/Illustrator on their computer and will be able to convert the files for you. There are many online services that will also do the conversion at a very moderate price such as http://www.vikingarts.com/prices.html

    Were you able to find on the Vista Print any information on about what file size limit they prefer? What DPI they prefer? I know they take many different file formats including eps but I wasn't able to locate exact information regarding what DPI or what size/s can be uploaded to them.
     
  3. 3DS

    3DS

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  4. KD-did

    KD-did

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  5. 3DS

    3DS

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    Like i always tell ppl...always, always, always prepare your graphics for printing at 300 dpi (at least), for rasterized pixel-based documents, or if you have a vector-based file like a file from Adobe Illustrator .eps, .ai or even .svg, even better they will print it directly from that and not the exported file from it (like we all share on here with others to view). also many printers also prefer Adobe Acrobat .pdf files for quality printing. I use that quite a bit as well, especially when sharing with other collegues and clients. I actually prepare all my work in ALL these formats to fit any printer's preference.

    Even your .psd Photoshop and CorelDraw and CorelPainter files are using vector-based shapes imbedded in it (text, shapes, paths and lines), are all vector based shapes, but still needed to be high-resolution for any and all other images in that file which are pixel-based (photography images, paint brush, air brush, efx, filters, feathers, gradients, masks, layer adjustment, etc). A word of advice here, gradients for vector art is bad (for printing), so keep this in mind when creating artwork that you plan on converting to vector. It may look kewel for vectorizing your artwork, so choose your weapons wisely.

    And also don't forget to create your files/artwork in CMYK for printing. Many ppl forget that when they start a new file and they're still in RGB mode. This will output your artwork for seeing colors on computer monitors (devices that use light; tvs, computer screens, mobile devices, the web, etc.) and the colors you think that are all nice and vibrant when you created them, will turn out flatter and a little duller looking when they print it out in CMYK. And then you'll be scratching your head asking "what the heck!"

    A quick word about vector images. They can't be "blown up" to the size of a bus as we'd like to think sometimes. Well not when it's exported as a .jpeg, .gif, .png...because they're still a "pixel-based" or "compressed" image when exported. They can however be resized that large from the "origional" native file of .eps, .ai, svg files though. I just wanted to get that out there. Also .eps files are still used for vector printing by printers that still use the "old-school" Encapsulated Post Script printers, that's why they may still request that sometimes. (more on that subject on transformational geometry if requested, lol). But most are using the Illustrator .ai files, just wanted you to be aware of this little factoid as well. Either way is cool.

    The exported vector images we use on a daily basis are perfectly fine and hardly noticeable when we enlarge them to crazy sizes on our monitors, when used at 300 dpi rather than at 72 dpi. Go ahead and experiment with what I mean on your own and you'll see, Zoom in like crazy on a 72 res vector image and you will notice heavy anti-aliasing (those square jaggies) along the edges, way more than a higher res vector exported jpeg.

    So to answer KD about the many files to upload (by VistaPrint) from thier specs for various artwork is: they are very cool about accomodating the many great files that we use out there for endless projects from the almost endless applications we use. Pretty nice of them huh?

    mkayyy. i think that should do it for class today kiddies. enuff chin music, get out there and be creative!
     
  6. RevRho

    RevRho

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    Thank you all for your help! I got the business cards done and will lookin into trying out the vector thingy..
     
  7. 3DS

    3DS

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    Welcome RevRho!

    Oh yeah, I also meant to say 'welcome' to the forum. My little class lecture above wasn't in any way saying you 'must' get your design done in vector format, sorry about that. I was just basically trying to get the basic facts out there about all the 'what, where, who, when & why's' of all the file formats and their uses available out there. I just seem to see a lot a talk about it lately and still a lot of confusion out there.

    For most of our artwork, used for business cards etc., a high resolution pixel (rasterized) image of 300 dpi will do the trick and that's all a printer asks for. Don't sweat it.
     
  8. Mr Laughingbird

    Mr Laughingbird Staff Member

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    3DS, you're input above is very valuable
    Thanks for taking the time to write it all!

    Marc
     
  9. 3DS

    3DS

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  10. latenights

    latenights

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    So helpful, thanks 3DS,

    It leads to another issue not far away from this one.

    Originally I used TLC4.1 back in the days, and I have never been able to get a business card that would look the right size and resolution that I could actually want to hand out.

    Along came CIC and it was clever but absolutely needed Vistaprint to get the printing aligned, so I shelved it. NOw I will try out BCC..

    I was thinking if there is any way you can give us a class using TLC5 and BCC (differing steps) and on producing a 3 x 5 business card from scratch?

    I have never known exactly how to resize with the export options, changing canvas size, output options. I have just PM'd Marc that the More export options tool to resize with proprtion maintained, where you cannot see the pixels in the title bar as you reduce the image for printing, etc etc. I would love to know how you experts get the 3" x 2" exactly when you cant see the pixel size. For example I take 96 pixels=1 inch and set a canvas size of 288 x 192, but is that correct?

    There seem to be so many things to watch out for, I am looking to some old heads for help with this. It's not always convenient to wait for Vistaprint, and you just want to send a file to the local commercial printer to do a small run. How do we get the design to output to the right quality, resolution etc for printing?

    What about this CMYK, RGB, what are the pros and cons of each setting?

    RevRho brought up some great questions and illicited a very throrough response frm 3DS.
     
  11. KD-did

    KD-did

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    latenights , business card stock can be bought with software for the template layout included if you want to print your own you just need to import you logo design into, drag it to size and print.

    Online printing it is best just to follow the printer's guide lines. Provide the files as requested.
     
  12. Buffbaud

    Buffbaud

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    Do your homework before picking Vista Print for your business cards. I'm not going to go into my personal experience with them again. If you google them you will find a lot of information about them.
     
  13. KD-did

    KD-did

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    IMHO business card printing is too important of an issue to outsource to any online entity, your local printer is far more likely to do a better job consistently because his/her reputation is on the line everytime in the community where he lives and works. The local printer is far more likely to bend over backwards and go the extra miles to make/keep you a happy customer.Online you are far less likely to be able to establish a dialog which is so very important. Online you can not feel the quality or see actual color of the paper stock. Online can look like a bargain compared to the local printer but remember it is your business image on the line and you need to be in control of that image at all times.
     
  14. latenights

    latenights

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    Thanks for all the good advice. In practice we have little choice. Printers charge just over $200 for 250 business cards on 350gr. That's why I am looking for online alternatives.

    No-one seems to have tackled the resizing/exporting questions. I am not a printer, just like to have nice artwork, and get my wife involved in a small business doing this.

    To KD-did, I already have Business Card Creator, so what are the recommendations for outputting the card artwork for a local printer?
     
  15. latenights

    latenights

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    Hi KD-did,

    which software are you thinking of?

    Thanks in advance
     
  16. KD-did

    KD-did

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    Preparation for your project is always key as 3DS covered above. Universally PDF file format is less likely to be a problem for any local printer and be void of artifacts, distortions or discolorations .

    I am quite sure what your question on software pertains to... desktop publishing or for the actual printing of business cards. Software that is available with the card stock simply matches the layout of the card stock...(spacings, margins and the number of cards per sheet to be printed). Before doing an actual run you can always do a test run on the paper pattern they also supply.
     

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