How to negotiate a price, etc - help needed

Discussion in 'Resource & Recommendations' started by Peart2112, Oct 9, 2007.

  1. Peart2112

    Peart2112

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    A friend said he needed some banner designs for his web site (he sells aftermarket auto parts) and that would pay me to do it. How do I go about determining a fee? Should he pay half up front or hourly? Do I supply him with many designs or just one? I don't do this professionally so I'm not looking to make a killing. I would do it for free but since he wants to pay. Why not? Could someone offer any relative advice? TIA!!! :image16-1:
     
  2. Peart2112

    Peart2112

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    I'm wondering why the previous post doesn't show up when I click new posts?
     
  3. Borpean

    Borpean Staff Member

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    Hi Peart... A very good question. If you haven't already, read this link... http://www.logodesignforum.com/forums/showthread.php?p=35282#post35282

    I think the best way to go about handling this or any project (novice or pro) in here is to show some samples. Does not have to be a lot and you don't need to show a variety of designs. Just show what the client wants. Maybe a variety of ideas pertaining to what they are looking for. In your case, auto parts.
    Then come up with a contract of some sort. Does not have to be a bunch of paperwork, just something simple. Basically telling them that since they want service your protecting your work just as they would protect their work. You can go half up front before you start, half when the project is complete. Even if you quote the project to be $40... A contract will be sure to give you something. Anything is better than nothing for hard work!
    Hourly depends on either the level of work, the client or how much time you think it will take to complete the project. Will it take a week? 2 days? and hour? Usually, if it's a short project or you know exactly how long it will take, a flat rate usually works best. Hourly rates vary.
    Also, doing work for friends or family usually lowers in rate. :image31:
    You can do a quick search on rates on any search site. Key words like : what to charge + freelance... etc.
    http://www.designtalkboard.com/design-articles/charging.php

    Also, be sure to post your work on here for any feed back. Always helps to get another eye sometimes if your stuck.

    Hope this helps!!
    Good luck!
     
  4. Peart2112

    Peart2112

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    Thanks Borpean. Great advice/info there. I came up with about 16 designs in about 6-8 hours time. At $10 an hour (that was the price the client originally mentioned) that would be $80. So I'm thinking of charging $40 up front and then the rest upon acceptance of one of the designs with revisions of course and the client keeps all the designs. Does that sound reasonable? If all goes well, I'll post the chosen design soon. Thanks again.
     
  5. Peart2112

    Peart2112

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    I wish I could edit my previous post. Does anyone have a sample contract I could use?
     
  6. Mr Laughingbird

    Mr Laughingbird Staff Member

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    Hi Peart.

    I hope Borpean's advise helps you a bit.

    I, personally, have always charged a flat rate for my work. My very first logo job I charged $99. That was back in the day.
    ... way back in the day.

    Most designers on the web now charge a flat rate. It's much easier for the client to know what he's getting into. If you say 'hourly' the client may not know that you're going to spend 50 hours on his logo. :D

    I would charge less at the beginning so that you can get a good client base (and testimonials page) going. Then raise your price every few months or so. Cap it at a price you think is fair to both of you.

    ALWAYS (and I do mean Always!!) get the client to sign a contract. Even a fake one you made up will hold some weight. If nothing else, it tells the client you're serious. Search Google for "Designer's Contract" or something similar. You may want to buy one from LegalZoom.com (they're not expensive. Some are just a few dollars).

    Collect half up front via Paypal. The easiest (and safest) way for both of you.

    Upon completion, send him his logo with a big water mark over it. Ask for the balance... and send him his artwork.

    Hope this helps some!


    - Marc
     
  7. Chris

    Chris Staff Member

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    WOW some excellent advise above. I sure hope it covers what you wanted.

    As far as editing post you have only so long that you can edit your post after making it. After that short time limit you can't edit your post anymore.
     
  8. Peart2112

    Peart2112

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    Thanks Marc. I pretty much have it all now. I found a decent contract I can use. How do I handle (sending/signing) a contract via email?
     
  9. Chris

    Chris Staff Member

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    What format is the contract in? If it is in a Microsoft Word format then you can email it to them and have them sign it and fax it to you. Or you can just use a fax machine to do it.
     

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