design parameters to printer settings

Discussion in 'General Support' started by pixiemaher, Jul 30, 2014.

  1. pixiemaher

    pixiemaher

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    hi all
    relatively new to this software and have been making great use of it on facebook etc.
    now i want to print a poster i designed but when i go to print it i have small problem.
    My template measured 1440x1440 resoloution so when i print it it is square and leaves rest of A4 page blank.
    otherwise it fills page but is now distorted due to expanding

    is there a way at start of design process to set my template format so as i automatcally am designing for A4 sizing?

    appreciate any advice and thanks
     
  2. gcuneo2

    gcuneo2

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    No. Output is printer dependent. I know A4 is 8.5 x 11 inches, but output at 300dpi requires 2480 Pixels x 3508 Pixels. In The Logo Creator, you take your height (lets call it 1000) by your width (lets call it 800), and multiply those two numbers, resulting in 800,000 bytes of data to work with. The max size of of logo in version 6.8 is 1440 x 1440.
    In version 6.0 of The Logo Creator the max size of a logo was 2880 x 2880.

    The Logo Creator isn't really designed to create images 8.5 x 11 inches in size,on a full sheet of typical paper, it is designed for you to create your image, then export it (the finished image) into whatever program you choose. Now for single images (like a business card) the Logo Creator cannot be beat. For a full page image it simply is easier to export your image into whatever program you want to use, and resize it. For onscreen only stuff like images for web pages, or facebook timeline covers--- again, The Logo Creator cannot be beat. Why? Most images on the web are only about 90 dpi, if measured that way, it's what makes web pages load quickly.

    Output and resolution are inversely proportional. What does that mean? If you increase your output to 600dpi (like on a laser printer) the image will shrink, proportionally, after all given the example above, you only have 800,000 bytes of info to work with.

    If you manually resize an in image in MS word for example, the image will only stretch so far-- equate that with pizza dough. The more you stretch the dough the thinner it gets in the middle till finally the dough falls apart in the middle-- you only have so much data to work with.
     
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  3. pixiemaher

    pixiemaher

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    Thank you so much Glenn for your very detailed and prompt reply.
    I understand now that the quality won't be at its best when moved to larger paper sizes such as A4. That's fine by me.
    Addendum to question though. If I keep the ratio roughly 2-3 (width/length) I should be able to view without (circles etc) being distorted too much?
     
  4. gcuneo2

    gcuneo2

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    Absolutely! the "distortion" i spoke about isn't even really noticed, unless someone points it out...

    The best thing to do is to "resample" the exported logo--- software looks at all the pixels and basically makes a good guess at duplicating whats already there to enlarge the image. It's often done because of the 300dpi requirement of commercial printers-- even your local copy shop. I can go on for years about that 300dpi business....


    The best part? There is a great FREE program that can resample your image, called GIMP. it's interface can be a bit overwhelming, but after about 15 minutes you will know all the basics. Here's the link: (There should not be any country restrictions on the download)....

    http://www.gimp.org/downloads/
     
  5. pixiemaher

    pixiemaher

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    Many many thanks! Cheers
     

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