300 DPI?

Discussion in 'The Logo Creator' started by yaffer, Feb 13, 2014.

  1. yaffer

    yaffer

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    I'm trying to create an image for an ad and it needs to be 300 dpi. I don't see any export control for resolution. Is Logo Creator the right tool for this?
     
  2. KD-did

    KD-did

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    Resolution can no longer be set by TLC. Look to an image editor .
     
  3. gunsmoke

    gunsmoke

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    If you haven't found a solution, Photoscape is a good free utility that will let you save in various DPI sizes.
     
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  4. Lori

    Lori

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    Thanks Gunsmoke! You just save me tons of time...it worked like a charm!!!
     
  5. gunsmoke

    gunsmoke

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    Glad it worked for you! Come on back any time and let us know what you're working on, and what we can do to help. :cool:
     
  6. Dacoda Digital

    Dacoda Digital

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    So...the original export can't be set to 300 dpi. Wouldn't bumping up the resolution using Photoscape make it grainy?
     
  7. gcuneo2

    gcuneo2

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    It all depends upon your printer, DPI is a term reserved for printers. BUT YES, THE SHORT ANSWER IS YES, if you try to just stretch it more than a "Smidgen"...

    Just "Bumping up" the resolution to 300 DPI will only work to a point.

    Take the horizontal and vertical numbers of your logo and multiply them. Lets say your logo is 500 x 500, that will result in 250,000 bytes of info to work with. Equate that with a blob of pizza dough. You can only stretch that blob so much before is starts to rip out, and get all messed up-- same thing with images.

    You computer screen typically is about 95dpi to 120dpi is resolution--if you physically measured the little pixels with a ruler. That's why small sized images look so pretty on your screen.

    Trust me: you can virtually ignore all those silly "72 DPI" warnings.

    I always recommend if you are going to send a logo to a real live print shop that uses CYMK dye-sub printers, you make that logo as big as you can (Which is 1440 x 1440 in version 6.8 of the logo creator) (The max size of a logo in version 6.0 is 2880 x 2880).

    The business cards add on pak print up beautifully because they pak alot of info into a small space....

    This is a very good article about the whole image resizing mess, and yes, it's a mess simply because of that pesky 72 DPI business!

    http://www.photoshopessentials.com/essentials/resizing-vs-resampling/
     
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  8. OldenGray

    OldenGray

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    Adobe Photoshop comes with a companion image editor called Adobe ImageReady. Try playing around with that. You can also download an open source program (free) called GIMP, sort of a poor man's Photoshop.
     
  9. gunsmoke

    gunsmoke

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    Actually, the new Gimp 2.8 isn't that bad! I use it quite a bit to remove backgrounds from images to make them transparent. Works great, and FREE is a lot cheaper than Photoshop!! :cowboyno:
     
  10. OldenGray

    OldenGray

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    Believe it or not, I still use Photoshop CS2, but I find GIMP 2.8 is pretty good. I just can't rationalize spending all that money to upgrade my Photoshop.:)
     

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